13.11.16. Birdlog

13-11-16-sunrise-frodsham-marsh-tony-broomeWith high pressure over the UK it was forecast to be cold and calm with some sun. They were correct technically. Dawn came with a beautiful sunrise and a pale blue sky and a heavy dew. What a day it would be with weather like that I thought. However, as I got further west along the M56, the greyer the sky became and by the time I got to Frodsham and stopped off for a latte from my favourite venue, it was completely overcast with high cloud, but not a breath of wind. I pulled up at the old log and sipped the coffee out of a Christmas(sy) decorated cup. Nearly that time again! I set off down the lane, disturbing thrushes as I did so and turned sharp left.

13.11.16. Buttonweed, Canal Pools, Frodsham Marsh. Tony Broome

13.11.16. Stonechatr, Frodsham Marsh. Tony BroomeThere were 6 Fieldfare, 15 Redwing, 10 Blackbird and 3 Song Thrush. Ever onward, I headed out up the Weaver. There were workmen in bright orange suits on the other side and the birds were few and those present were jumpy. A pair of Stonechat sat and watched me pass by, ignoring me for the most and dropping down to catch insects every now and again. The ground was carpeted in Buttonweed Cortula coronopifolia in flower, an introduced species from South Africa. The yellow flowers brightened up what was becoming quite a gloomy day.

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13.11.16. Common Sandpiper, Weaver Estuary, Frodsham Marsh. Tony BroomeA Green Sandpiper called overhead as it came off Frodsham Score, followed shortly after by a Common Sandpiper which came out in front of me and flew off across the river. Two Grey Wagtail also fed by the water, not far from a small group of waders, 30 Redshank and 11 Black-tailed Godwit. 16 Curlew were roosting on the grass with their heads down, whilst around 200 Dunlin and a single Grey Plover fed on the mud as the tide receded. 7 Grey Heron sat about lazily waiting for the tide to drop lower still.

13.11.16. Cormorantr, Weaver Estuary, Frodsham Marsh. Tony Broome

13.11.16. Cormorant, Weaver Estuary, Frodsham Marsh. Tony Broome

I watched a Cormorant wrestling with an eel for quite a while, before the bird dived and came up with a lump in its neck, obviously having won the contest. The water was flat calm, flatter than I can remember and every bird stood out as they drifted past. I scanned in the hope of something unusual, but it wasn’t to be. 12 Great-Crested Grebe in total, 6 on the river and 6 on the Mersey estuary. One bird was in full summer plumage and a pair were displaying to each other, head-shaking in their rituals.

13.11.16. River Barge, Weaver Estuary, Frodsham Marsh. Tony Broome

 

13.11.16. Common Sandpiper, Weaver Estuary, Frodsham Marsh. Tony Broome13.11.16. Kingfisher, Frodsham Marsh. Tony BroomeAnother Common Sandpiper, the second one of the day flew towards me and pitched in under the bank. I tried sneaking up on it but couldn’t find it, but was treated to nice views of a female Kingfisher which hovered and sat about in front of me for some time. An old barge, the ‘Loach’ appeared and chugged past me with an almost perfect reflection in the water. Other than that, 48 Tufted Duck and 32 Coot on the Weaver, along with 20 Goldeneye further towards the Weaver Bend were the only real counts of any description. 27 Pink-footed Goose flew a long way to the west of me and dropped onto the salt marsh. Numbers of Lapwing at my end of the Score were low, with about 250 feeding on the grass.

13.11.16. Meadow Pipit, Frodsham Marsh. Tony Broome

13.11.16. Partial leusistic Blackbird, Frodsham Marsh. Tony BroomeTime for lunch. Another pair of Stonechat sat around in Redwall reed bed along with a small flock of Meadow Pipit. A black thrush with white on its head dived past me and I managed to locate it in a dense Hawthorn. It turned out to be a partially leucistic male Blackbird. I drove around to No.6 and put up a flock of 61 Common Snipe which was a great count considering that they are usually in ones or twos and there were 3 at the west end of No.3 and 2 more in the ‘Secluded Pool’, making 66 for the day. No.6 held a single Little Egret, 2 Dunlin, 2 Ruff and 1 Little Stint.

13.11.16. Cetti's Warbler, Frodsham Marsh. Tony Broome

13.11.16. Little Egret, Weaver Estuary, Frodsham Marsh. Tony BroomeAlyn Chambers counted the ducks, but I didn’t spend a long time there before moving on to No.3, having finished lunch with included a piece of New York deli pie, a food tick for me and well worth it. The day got even gloomier and it began to get dark by 3 o’clock.

The so-called “mitigation” area of No.3 is a jok!. With zero management in place, it is choked by nettles, docks and thistles. Consequently, apart from 60+ Teal, there was nothing else. So much for the promises made by Peel Energy and the people involved with the ongoing work here.

I headed back down No.6 where a Cetti’s Warbler appeared briefly before noisily moving away. An immature Marsh Harrier came off No.4 and disappeared over into the vast bed of phragmites. 10 more Fieldfare went north and another 20 dropped into the silver birch on No.6 to roost. The Starling began to arrive, totaling around 1000, pursued by an adult Marsh Harrier which deftly caught one without really trying and a Sparrowhawk which only panicked the flock and it failed miserably. A single Kestrel didn’t even bother but hovered for small mammals instead.

13.11.16. Pied Wagtail, Weaver Estuary, Frodsham Marsh. Tony BroomeSo not to bad-a-day really. Not much good for photography, but at least a few interesting things. I drank what was left of my coffee saddled up my vehicle and headed back east along the M56 into the darkness!

Observer: Tony Broome (images 1-14 & 16-20)

13.11.16. Merlins, No.3 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Alyn ChambersThe high tide on the estuary was a little higher than yesterday and brought in a better selection of waders to No.6 tank today they included: 1 Grey Plover, 2 Golden Plover and 5 Ruff with Lapwing. 1 Bar-tailed Godwit with 200 Black-tailed Godwit. Also 1 Little Stint and 1 Avocet. 30 Pink-footed Goose flew west and a Cetti’s Warbler was calling from the reeds. A pair of Merlin were on No.3 tank.

Observer: Alyn Chambers (image 15).

13.11.16. Common Sandpiper, Mersey Estuary, Frodsham Marsh. Tony Broome13.11.16. Weaver Estuary, Frodsham Marsh. Tony Broome13.11.16. Weaver Estuary, Frodsham Marsh. Tony Broome13.11.16. Weaver Estuary, Frodsham Marsh. Tony Broome13.11.16. Ducks, Frodsham Marsh. Tony Broome

A few more of Tony’s images from today on the marsh.

22.10.16. Birdlog

22-10-16-stonechat-frodsham-marsh-bill-morton-1

22-10-16-raven-frodsham-marsh-bill-morton-3Out this morning from Ince along the Manchester Ship Canal path heading east and around No.6 tank.  A flock of Long-tailed Tit had a couple of Goldcrest with them as they made their way along the hedgerow.

The new pools at Ince Marsh fields were quiet with only a single Grey Heron and a few Moorhen occupying them. Reed Bunting were gathering in good numbers as was the Robin with several territorial disputes going on between established birds and migrants. Flocks of Redwing were passing through heading west followed in hot pursuit by a Sparrowhawk hoping to pick off a tired bird.

22-10-16-reed-bunting-frodsham-marsh-bill-morton-2Out on the Frodsham Score salt marsh were 5 Little Egret scattered about and a large flock of Common Teal and Wigeon which exploded into the air when 5 wildfowlers made their way out on to the marsh. A Great Crested Grebe was amongst the Coot and Tufted Duck on the ship canal. Meanwhile, the Raven gathered alongside Great Black-backed Gull numbers feeding on the ever-present free mutton liberally scattered about the area. Waiting for thirds were the omnipresent Common Buzzard.

22-10-16-view-from-weston-road-weston-looking-out-across-frodsham-marsh-bill-morton

Three Stonechat were along the path by the northern ramp onto No.6 and a male Kestrel sat on a fence post nearby. A Great Spotted Woodpecker left a stand of dead trees near the Growhow works compound and alongside No.4 a Grey Wagtail with a flock of alba wags near the Holpool Gutter. The fields alongside the gutter held a few hundred Lapwing with several Golden Plover with them.

Observer: Paul Ralston (images1-3).

22-10-16-view-from-plane-looking-down-on-frodsham-marsh-bill-morton-8

22-10-16-view-from-plane-looking-down-on-frodsham-marsh-bill-morton-322-10-16-view-from-plane-looking-down-on-frodsham-marsh-bill-morton-5A big thanks to Chris Done who took these aerial shots looking down over Frodsham Marsh yesterday from a flight out of New York JFK. Chris was a young Elton birder who could be found birding the marsh in his younger days. He scored many fine finds including a singing Nightingale along Lordship Lane a few years back.

Image 4 by WSM and images 5-7 by Chris Done.

The Marshes c1900

the-weaver-estuary-frodsham-marsh-c1900-2I have been looking a long time for images of Frodsham Marsh shortly after the Manchester Ship Canal was completed and today I have been successful. The first image shows the Weaver estuary (inner top left) with its marshland edges and the cultivated fields stretching inland to the village of Frodsham. At the far right hand side is the Weaver Bend with the small island visible and Weston Marsh which today is under a disused sludge tank.

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The second photograph shows the flooded No.1 sludge tank occupying the river marshland area.The container walls are excavated soil taken from the interior of the sludge bed and are no higher than a couple of metres.   It is only speculation what this tank situated a stone’s throw from the River Mersey would have attracted all those years ago. There were no ornithologists/bird watchers in the area to catalogue the huge flocks of waders, not to mention the numerous Nearctic shorebirds that surely must have appeared each autumn. I’ll have to get me one of those time travelling machines when they get invented.

On both images it is interesting to note the lack of development in Runcorn and across the Liverpool skyline.

WSM.

Moorditch Lane

17.07.16. Sign on Moorditch Lane, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (1)

17.07.16. Ditch along Moorditch Lane, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (4)17.07.16. Ditch along Moorditch Lane, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (2)17.07.16. Ditch along Moorditch Lane, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (1)02.05.16. Rainbow over Moorditch Lane, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (3)A few images of the wildlife-filled drainage channel bordering Moorditch Lane. Moorditch Lane track is one of the oldest thoroughfares on the marsh dating back to the Doomsday book. The lane was used in days of old to access the marshes at both Frodsham and Helsby. In more recent times (pre 1993) it was the main access route to the sludge pumping station.

Images by WSM.

Different Views

27.04.16. Weaver Bend from Cow Hey Lane, Rocksavage, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton

A collection of images looking south from Rocksavage overlooking the works. This one is of the Weaver Bend.

26.04.16. Weaver Bend from Cow Hey Lane, Rocksavage, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton

Partially obscured by the pipes, scaffolding and towers Rocksavage Plant dominates the foreground but beyond is one of the best birding spots in Cheshire.

27.04.16. Weston Marsh lagoon from Cow Hey Lane, Rocksavage, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton

Weston Marsh lagoon is out-of-bounds to birders except for paid ecologists but is clearly an area ideally suited for shorebirds and Common Shelduck.

27.04.16. Weston Marsh Lagoon from Cow Hey Lane, Rocksavage, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton The same area with the works in the foreground and No.1 tank beyond.

26.04.16. Weston Marsh Lagoon and the Weaver Bend as seen from Cow Hey Lane, Rocksavage, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton

The raised banks of the lagoon host nesting Common Shelduck.

26.04.16. Weston Marsh Lagoon and the Weaver Bend as seen from Cow Hey Lane, Rocksavage, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton

The River Weaver bottom right, Weston Marsh, No.1 tank and the Welsh Hills in the distance.

26.04.16. I.C.I tank as seen from Cow Hey Lane, Rocksavage, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton

The edge of the works with the River Weaver running alongside the wooded former I.C.I tank which many older birders will have ticked off such birds as Buff-breasted, Baird’s, Pectoral Sandpiper, Wilson’s Phalarope, Shorelarks etc etc.

26.04.16. I.C.I tank as seen from Cow Hey Lane, Rocksavage, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton

It’s still hard to believe the woodland shown above was once the I.C.I sludge tank and beyond are the Frodsham Hills.

26.04.16. I.C.I tank as seen from Cow Hey Lane, Rocksavage, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton

A track around the I.C.I tank.

26.04.16. M56 Motorway bridge over the Weaver Navigation as seen from Cow Hey Lane, Rocksavage, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton

The M56 motorway crosses the Weaver Navigation.

26.04.16. M56 Motorway bridge over the Weaver Navigation as seen from Cow Hey Lane, Rocksavage, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton

All images by WSM.

Frodsham Marsh Wind Farm in Photos #4

26.04.16. Preparation of erecting tower for wind turbine from Cow Hey Lane, Rocksavage, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton

26.04.16. Preparation for erecting tower on No.1 tank today, Frodsham Marsh. Bill MortonThe scale of the wind farm on Frodsham Marsh is hinted at by this crane hoisting components for the installation of just one of the turbines. This one is in the north-east corner of No.1 tank (Cell 1) overlooking the Weaver Estuary.

27.04.16. Crane hoisting the first tower on No.1 tank today, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton27.04.16. Crane hoisting the first tower on No.1 tank today, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (3)27th April saw the hoisting of the first tower (stanchion) base presumably it will come in 2-3 parts?

All images by WSM.

Views on and from No.6 tank

 

23.04.16. Views off and from No.6 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (17) - Copyselection of images from today at No.6 tank of views that would be unfamiliar to regular visitors and taken on a fine summer’s day. 

23.04.16. Views off and from No.6 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (7) - CopyHelsby Hill is a dominant feature to the south-west of the marshes and the open water in front was once open farmland and part of the vast Lordship Marsh.

23.04.16. Views off and from No.6 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (4)

A remnant and solitary hawthorn tree is one of the last dead hedgerows that once formed the field boundaries on Lordship Marsh.

23.04.16. Views off and from No.6 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (11) - Copy

Today this area occupies No.6 deposit sludge tank that contains the sludge and silt from the nearby Manchester Ship Canal.

23.04.16. Views off and from No.6 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (24) - Copy

The Growhow works is part of an encroaching industrial sprawl from west of the Holpool Gutter at the former Ince Marshes.

23.04.16. Ramp track off Moorditch Lane, No.5 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (2)

The ramp track to No.5 tank off Moorditch Lane.

23.04.16. Old drainage shaft tower, No.5 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (2)

An old drainage tower on No.5 tank which is slowly falling into disrepair.

All images by WSM.

Round the Back (Part 2)

10.04.16. Sheep skulls on Frodsham Score. Bill Morton (5)

10.04.16. Ferry terminal to Frodsham Score. Bill MortonSometime ago I wrote a blog post (Round the Back Part 1) about a visit I made in my youth to Frodsham Score and Mount Manisty with Halton RSPB members group. At the end of article I mentioned that I would love to make a return visit and last Sunday (10.04.16) my wish came true. 10.04.16. Redshank in the Gowy Gutter. Bill Morton (4)

10.04.16. Redshank in the Gowy Gutter. Bill Morton (2)We arrived (that is Sparky my partner and me) at Stanlow oil refinery in a cold easterly breeze to join a group of 7 other http://www.bto.org/volunteer-surveys/webs volunteers for the monthly wader and wildfowl count on and off the vast southern Mersey marshes. After the compulsory security check we were ferried by minibus to the terminal and then ferried (literally) across the Manchester Ship Canal to the ‘no man’s land’ that is the salt marsh border edge of the River Mersey. There were high metal security fences, locked gates and derelict buildings which once housed a police station and the works of a time gone by … and not a little unlike what I imagined a cold war Russian Gulag prison camp would look like.

02.05.15. Wheatear, Weaver Bend, Frodsham MarshWe were split into groups and Sparky and myself were joined by Brian Tollitt and our chaperone for the duration Dermot Smith. After negotiating the wader infested shiny River Gowy as it squeezed under the ship canal to broaden out into a proud beast of a gutter complete with dozens of noisy Redshank we edged our way single file along the bramble covered banks to reach a path sandwiched between the canal and the short-cropped damp salt marsh to our left. I know it may sound a bit childish but I had a fizz of excitement deep down in my heart for the realisation that I was walking out to the forbidden land of Frodsham Score. As we walked along I was conscious of keeping Sparky (a non birder) company but taking in the atmosphere all around me which was hugely distracting.

10.04.16. Badger prints on Frodsham Score. Bill Morton (2)

A male Wheatear popped up on the edge of the marsh, we startled a Fox as it  crossed the path ahead and Badger prints pressed into the soft ground were an indication of other wildlife here.

10.04.16. Oystercatchers, astham. Shaun Hickey (3)Shortly after, it or another Fox appeared out on the marsh nonchalantly passing a few Shelduck in a tidal pool and further out two Whooper Swans looked regal against a backdrop of Hale lighthouse and the pale green shimmering heat hazed bridge that crosses the river from Widnes to Runcorn.

10.04.16. Whooper Swans and views on Frodsham Score. Bill Morton (10)All around were signs of industry from the huge works of Ineos Chlor to the east, Stanlow disappearing slowly behind and the majestic Liverpool skyline to the north-west. We were walking along the edge of Ince Marsh, ignoring the ammonia wafting in from the pig farm and the smell of burning plastic that hung in the air and for just one moment I was lost in the green wilderness.

Despite these minor distractions we eventually stopped for lunch and Sparky brought out a small bottle of white wine to aid the creative juices which as it happened came in handy with the numerous bleached white sheep skulls illuminating the tide line kerb edge on the marsh hike and my creation (see top photograph).

10.04.16. Golden Plover on Frodsham Score. Bill Morton (2)

10.04.16. Tree on Frodsham Score. Bill MortonIt beggars belief how many sheep succumb to the highest tides at night but it’s a frightening place for the uninitiated, never mind sheep that only think the grass is greener on the edge bordering the river. A small covey of partial summer plumaged Golden Plover were hunkered down in a small channel to avoid the freshening cold wind while we scoffed our dinner. We had a little time to kill whilst the farmer tended to herding his flock to areas of safety close to the ship canal before we continued our walk out to the raised banks in the distance. 10.04.16. Cow bones on Frodsham Score. Bill Morton (1)

10.04.16. Building on Frodsham Score. Bill Morton (1)We left Brian behind to count and photograph the birds which were coming closer in with the tide. There was an amusing sight tinged with a little bizzareness when a scene from a spaghetti western reared its ugly head. A desiccated cow complete with its weathered hide and one horned skull looked up at us from the outside of the wildfowlers retreat bringing a smirk to my face.

 10.04.16. Sheep skulls on Frodsham Score. Bill Morton (2)

 

Perhaps the most testing time of the day was negotiating the gathered sheep on the banks of the revetment wall. We gingerly inched our way giving the sheep a wide berth but this meant having to venture out onto the gelatinous salt marsh mud with the partially submerged arched sheep vertebrae and hideous skulls poking out. It was reminiscent of a scene from the film the Lord of the Rings where Gollom leads Frodo and Sam through the dead marshes. 10.04.16. Small gutters on Frodsham Score. Bill Morton (1)

10.04.16. Barnacle Geese over Frodsham Score. Bill Morton (6)We did eventually find an area of terra firma from where we climbed up the embankment to watch the swelling river. Although it was an impressive mega tide it wasn’t particularly brilliant for bird numbers and most of the good stuff had decamped over on my usual WeBS count pitch looking over No.3 and 6 tanks further to the south-east on Frodsham Marsh proper. 10.04.16. Pink-footed Geese over Frodsham Score. Bill Morton (10)

10.04.16. Ravens over Frodsham Score. Bill Morton (1)The avian highlights of the day involved an impressive flock of 75 Raven disturbed from the edge of the score followed by a roving gaggle of 34 Pink-footed and 6 Barnacle circling the Mersey basin looking for a suitable dry area to settle during the tide. Dermot went off to count some Oystercatchers a little further away and I continued my count while Sparky watched the mini tsunami pour force across the marsh twisting, doubling back and seeping forth into all the channels before eventually the whole of the marsh was covered.

10.04.16. The Royal Iris sails to Eastham Locks past Frodsham Score. Bill Morton (5)

10.04.16. The Royal Iris sails to Eastham Locks past Frodsham Score. Bill Morton (1)The blue skies and brisk weather all highlighted what a wonderful area on the banks of the River Mersey we share with all those birds and wildlife. When Dermot got back to us to us he said he’d had a brief view of a Seal but it didn’t reappear. As the tide resided we gathered for the walk back and to join up with Brian at the shooters hut. Just then the ship canal cruise boat Royal Iris sailed by heading to Eastham Lock from Salford Quays.

10.04.16. Views from Frodsham Score. Bill Morton (2)

There were more Wheatears encountered with a White Wagtail a first for the summer. A couple of Little Ringed Plover and a Common Sandpiper were also new in.

10.04.16. High tide Oystercatchers at Eastham. Shaun Hickey (1)As we approached the River Gowy gutter small flocks of Redshank were waiting the tide out on the banks with a gathering of brick-red Black-tailed Godwit bunched closely. Another Fox was spotted before we met the other counters who had emerged from the west of the marshes. As we gathered at the wire fences and disused building to gain access to the ferry terminus, it was time for me to reflect on a brilliant day spent out on the banks of the south Mersey marshes and the 8 mile walk didn’t even register on the legs. A final crossing of the ship canal by the ferry man brought us back to the mainland and after a combined count up of the sightings we ended a really great day out on the edge of the river.

10.04.16. Black-tailed Godwits, Gowy Gutter. Bill Morton (2)

If you are interested in getting involved and feel you can contribute some of your time to a worthwhile project with future counts on the River Mersey check this facebook page out for more information: Mersey Estuary WeBS

Written by WSM (images 1-4 & 6-7 & 9-22 & 24).

Images 5 & 8 & 23 by Shaun Hickey.

Thanks to Dermot Smith and Brian Tollitt for their time and company on the day. A big thanks to Shaun Hickey a fellow Mersey marshophile for kick starting part 1.

Wind Farm in Photos #1

20.03.16. No.4, Frodsham Marsh from Helsby Hill. Bill Morton..

20.03.16. No.4 and No.6 tank, Frodsham Marsh from Helsby Hill. Bill Morton Lordship Marsh/Lane and the silage tank (top image) in the foreground with the ramp track leading from the lane to No.4 tank with No.6 tank (centre right & upper image).The 2nd image also showing one of the canal sludge pipes (at the south-west corner of No.6 tank).

20.03.16. No.4 tank, Frodsham Marsh from Helsby Hill. Bill Morton (5)20.03.16. No.4 tank, Frodsham Marsh from Helsby Hill. Bill Morton (12)

20.03.16. No.4 tank, Frodsham Marsh from Helsby Hill. Bill Morton (13)

The above images show Lower Rake Lane leading to Lordship Lane and the access track up and across the west end of No.4 tank. Below the centre line of scattered trees lays the Manchester Ship Canal and beyond that is the southern Mersey salt marshes (Frodsham Score) and the River Mersey.20.03.16. No.4 tank, Frodsham Marsh from Helsby Hill. Bill Morton (11)

The centre of No.4 tank with the pale areas showing the bases to the wind turbines and lower parts of the image shows the access track on Lordship Marsh.

20.03.16. No.4 tank, Frodsham Marsh from Helsby Hill. Bill Morton (3)Hill View Farm on Lordship Marsh with No.4 tank and the River Mersey beyond.

20.03.16. No.4 tank, Frodsham Marsh from Helsby Hill. Bill Morton (10)

20.03.16. No.4 tank, Frodsham Marsh from Helsby Hill. Bill Morton (1)

The south-west corner of 4 and the arable land of Lordship Marsh. The bottom image showing the raised base for one of the 21 wind turbines. Hale lighthouse in the background on the north banks of the River Mersey.

20.03.16. No.4 and No.6 tank, from Helsby Hill. Bill Morton.

No.6 tank set in the middle of Frodsham Marsh.

27.02.16. No.4 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (4) 07.02.16. No.4 tank, frodsham Marsh. Shaun Hickey.

Work on the foundations for the turbine bases on No.4 tank.

01.10.15. Wind Farm turbine bases, No.1 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (2) 01.10.15. Wind Farm turbine bases, No.1 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (1)

More bases in position on No.1 tank.

All images by WSM.