The Last Post – 01.05.22. Birdlog.

Greenshank from archive – WSM

A very early start and a walk along Weaver Lane and down to the Weaver Bend with the low water level making it irritable to avoid calling here first. On arrival an adult summer Mediterranean Gull was on the small island with 6 nesting pairs of Black-headed Gull. The testosterone coursing through the loins of this presumed male didn’t deter it from making advances to another pair of displaying Black-headed Gulls. I wouldn’t be surprised to see younger versions of its kind appearing sometime this month?

Many pairs of Pied Avocet had over spilled from their nesting site close by with birds in the act of copulating. A small flock of 13 Dunlin, several Eurasian Oystercatcher and a single Common Sandpiper. Nearby 3 Grasshopper Warbler were singing and a pair of European Stonechat were at the Lum. While amore was evidently in the air a pair of Great Crested Grebe shuffled out of the water onto the small island, mounted, mated, dismounted and returned to their watery mire.

Later I made my way over to No.6 tank with several hundred Black-tailed Godwit and a single Bar-tailed Godwit, a Common Greenshank, 1 Whimbrel, 14 Ruff including a black ruffed male displaying to a nearby reeve. 6 Dunlin and 2 Common Redshank. A Western Marsh Harrier was in the area hunting the banks of the tank (like it did yesterday).

Other birds of note were 3 Common Swift.

Observer: WSM (& JS who could only manage putting up with birding for the afternoon period).

As this is the final posting from me and sad to see the ending of the bird blog, and I’m sure it means a lot to many people and not just people from this part of the world its been a pleasure to have been a small part of it.

I started this morning around No.6 and No.4 tanks before moving on to the Weaver Bend. Walking up the ramp to No.6 tank and the first of many Common Whitethroat broke into song before it flew to an elderberry bush. It then sat next to a smart male Whinchat which moved to a small reedbed close by.

Warblers were numerous during the walk with Blackcap, Common Chiffchaff, Willow Warbler, Cetti’s, Western Reed and Sedge we’re all vocal, two Cetti’s were even brave enough to show themselves!

The 3 Barnacle Goose were still in situ on No.3 tank with the many Canada Goose and Greylags. The male Western Marsh Harrier hunted over the ‘phalarope pool’ scattering all that was on there and the ‘splashing pool’. 

A look over No.6 tank from the south bank produced a flock of c500 Black-tailed Godwit with a white headed Ruff and the Spotted Redshank.

On to the Weaver Bend were several Pied Avocet, 6 Black-tailed Godwit and 2 Common Sandpiper were noted, just a single Mediterranean Gull sat with the black-heads on the island.

Observer: Paul Ralston.

The final post from me and the Frodsham Marsh Birdblog is today, but over the last ten years a lot of people have made their contributions and I want to take this opportunity in personally thanking them for their efforts putting pen to paper, or submitting images that have made the read a little bit more memorable and they include: Ted Abraham, Pete Antrobus, Greg Baker, Steve & Gill Barber, Paul Brewster, Tony Broome (who did a sterling job before we fell out), Julia Burgess, Rob Cockbain, Alyn Chambers, Allan Conlin, Paul Crawley, Dave Craven, Paul Derbyshire, Chris Done, Guido D’Isidoro, Frank Duff, Tom Edmondson, Keith Gallie, Martin Garner, Mark (Whipper) Gibson, Martin Gilbert, Arthur Harrison, Shaun Hickey, Ian Igglesden, Liam Langley, Stuart Maddocks, Paul Miller, Elliot Montieth, Sean O’Hara, Mark Payne, Paul Ralston (for being a great supporter of the blog and contributing so much to make it even better), John Rayner, Scott Reid, Jacqui & Idris Roberts, Ray Scally, Barry Starmer, Jane Turner, Graham Thomason, Emily Traynor, James Walsh, Gareth Walker, Don Weedon, Jonathan Williams, Findley Wilde, Heather Wilde, Mark Wilkinson, Phil Woollen, Mark Wotham and finally to Julie who is the light of my life.

It’s goodbye from me Bill Morton aka WSM / @FrodshamBirder

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