18.09.16. Birdlog & Nature Notes #54

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After spotting a tweet about 4 Great White Egret from Dave Craven over at Hale lighthouse and due to my limited availability today, I decided I shouldn’t miss out on relocating his discovery out on Frodsham Score. However, the score isn’t that easy to access especially since the turbines have been erected on the marsh. So, the easier option was to watch from Runcorn Hill which would give me a wide panorama vista across the Mersey Estuary and the Frodsham Score salt marsh.

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Where I was set up the morning sun soon warmed the back of my neck and cast some excellent light across the river. It didn’t take long before I singled out a Great White Egret which flew across the salt marsh to join a second bird. Further along the tidal gutters emerged a third bird and close to a group of gorging Raven, Great Black-backed Gull and Carrion Crow feasting on another dead sheep was a fourth bird. A potential fifth bird gave a tantalizingly brief view in a gutter close to a group of 19 scattered Little Egret.

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Observer and images: WSM (with a grateful nod to DC).

18-09-16-frodsham-score-from-frodsham-marsh-paul-ralston-1A walk from Ince along the Manchester Ship Canal as far as No.4 tank during high tide.  A Little Grebe has joined the Mallard and Common Teal on one of the new pools at Ince and a Chiffchaff was feeding in the trackside vegetation. Along the canal path 2 more Chiffchaff were noted and the ‘Heinz 57 goose’ was on the canal with the Canada  . Two of the WeBs counters were making their way along the salt marsh ready for their high tide count in the warm sunshine.

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18-09-16-pleasure-boat-on-the-msc-from-frodsham-marsh-paul-ralston-2A small pleasure boat made its way west along the canal and flushed a Green Sandpiper as it went by while a female Stonechat was flycatching from a hawthorn bush. A flight of several Common Snipe flew overhead on to 4. A couple of hundred Dunlin were resting by the Holpool Gutter as the tide filled the channels and were joined by Oystercatcher, Redshank and Curlew. There were at least 10 Little Egret and a single Great White Egret were feeding as the water covered the marsh (where the other four went I have no idea?). A Peregrine chased down a wader and landed with it in the shallow water while the local gulls and crows tried to intimidate it while the raptor impressively mantled its prey. There were at least 2 Pink-footed Goose on the marsh.

A further 25 Pink-footed Goose were spotted by the WeBS counters along with confirmation that there were 5 GWE at Ince Marsh). Eds.

Observer: Paul Ralston (images 4-6).

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The middle of September 2016 and the height of the Autumn migration, or at least it is if you are on the east coast. I thought that I’d give Frodsham Marsh one more chance to prove itself as I headed down the M56 at the rather casual time of 9.30 am. It wasn’t to be a journey without incident. As I passed junction 11 I was thinking of where I’d start my bird watch off and was idling along in the middle lane (like you do) when I noticed what I took to be a big white paper bag in the outside lane close to the central reservation. As I passed it, it put its head up, looked around, and went back to sleep. An adult Mute Swan asleep with cars narrowly avoiding a collision with it! I called the emergency services but they’d had several calls already and were on their way. It had been a full harvest moon last night and I wondered whether the swan had mistaken the motorway for a river?

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Calling at the local coffee house briefly for two take-out lattes, extra hot, one shots, I headed for the junction of tanks 3, 5 and 6, parked up and set up for a raptor vigil, the clear blue sky and sunshine looking promising for big birds of prey. Common Buzzard were everywhere with at least 14 throughout the day. Add to that a Marsh Harrier quartering No.3 and 5, with 3 Kestrel and 4 Sparrowhawk and a Hobby soaring in the distance over No.3 and it wasn’t a bad tally. But no Osprey or Honey Buzzard as hoped for. The second sighting of Marsh Harrier was over No.5 where it soared through the array of wind turbines level with the middle of the blades. If they’d been going around, it might not have been so good for the harrier.

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Out on the mitigation (see image 7) 9 Wigeon dropped into the pools but disappeared into the waist-high vegetation, the pools remaining invisible due to the lack of credible management. 2 Ruff flew over onto No.6 tank.  The recent passage of hirundines were few and I only saw Swallow, perhaps 20-25 through the day. The local Meadow Pipits and a few Skylark flew about the beds but there was not obvious movement.The vast thistle beds held big flocks of swirling Goldfinch, and I guessed at over c500, but it could easily have been double that.

18-09-16-secluded-poolfrodsham-marsh-tony-broome-2Alyn Chambers appeared and joined us for an hour or so. He had walked all the way down the south side of No.4 and had many warblers during the walk. All I had Chiffchaff calling! A Kingfisher flew past over No.3 before turning around and heading for the ‘Splashing Pool’ where Alyn had seen it earlier. The dried up pools on No.3 had four alba Wagtail and a Yellow, but no waders. A Dunlin did fly over and looked as if it was interested, but thought better of it and flew back to the Frodsham Score where the high tide at around 1400hrs covered some of the Score marsh but not enough to push any waders onto the tanks. No.6 has at last got a muddy margin, but apart for a couple of waders Alyn saw, there was nothing of note.

18-09-16-migrant-hawker-frodsham-marsh-tony-broome-2I had a look at the secluded pool but apart from a single Tufted Duck and 3 Coot, it was birdless at first. A Water Rail did scream a little after I arrived and there were 2 or 3 Reed Warbler in the margins, but nothing major. Insects took over my attention as a fine Small Copper landed in front of me. They aren’t very common and a September one was nice. Large White’s and Red Admiral were moving south throughout the day and I saw c10 of the former and c25 of the latter, all singles and all straight through. There was a handful of local Small Tortoishell as well. The pool had a single Common Darter, 2 Brown Hawker and around 10 Migrant Hawker.

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A quick look at No.6 on the way past revealed a couple of hundred ducks, mainly Common Teal, but the sunlight was against me and I carried on to Marsh Farm where I found the fore-mentioned Hobby still quartering the thistle beds, but still too far away for a photo. The farmer had dumped a dead calf next to the track and the putrid smell attracted hundreds of flies (and surely competed with the stinkhorn mentioned in NN#53). Surely to leave a dead animal where members of the public can walk by is against Defra policy?

A weather front approached from the west and the last rays of silver light caught the turbines on No.4. Not a bad day if only for the sunshine and 22c. It was just nice to have been out with a chance of something unusual. Maybe next time…?

Observers: Tony Broome (images 7-13) and Alyn Chambers.

Nature Notes #54

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18-09-16-black-darter-black-lake-delamere-forest-bill-morton-35A late summer walk along the sun dappled glades of Delamere Forest hoping to find a few ordanata and early autumnal fungi. At Black Lake there were still a few darters and dragonflies including a very confiding Black Darter with Common Darter and two Brown Hawker actively hunting around the water margins.

Earlier as we headed out to Black Lake from the main path we took a diversion through a less worn route which we hadn’t covered before. All along the walk in a series of spots you couldn’t avoid smelling the rancid odour of Stinkhorns. 18-09-16-stinkhorn-delamere-forest-bill-morton-1The smell hangs in the air in patches but because of the heavy growth of bracken it was almost impossible to find the fungi. One particular spot produced a rampant stipe complete with oozing head covered in flies and didn’t half pong! There were several emerging eggs ready to thrust out of the ground and it looked and reads…”Carry On-esk”.

A short distance away were a few Tawny Grisette and a rarely encountered Clitocybe Odora. Further discoveries revealed numerous Earthballs, Burgundy coloured Russula’s and Saffron Milkcaps.

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Observers: Sparky, WSM (images 1-3, 14-18).