17.07.16. Birdlog

17.07.16. Cuckoo (juvenile), No.5 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (3)I could almost imagine hearing the song from the Isley Brothers 1974 version of Summer Breeze wafting through my mind as I walked out along the dusty track of No.5 tank. The weather was in glorious form, unfortunately a combination of heat haze, humidity and few birds more or less generated a pleasant summer walk in the breeze.

16.07.16. Wood Pigeons and turbines from Moorditch Lane, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (3)

17.07.16. Wind turbines, No.6 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (5)Well, there were a few birds to keep us entertained not least the juvenile Cuckoo that popped up in the scattered Elder bushes on No.5 tank. A few singing Sedge Warbler were still holding territory whilst recently fledged birds from many different passerine species were emerging from trees, bushes, reed beds and grassy meadows.

The mitigation on No.3 tank is basically a nettle bed with just a corner available for the intended species i.e Lapwing. A Ruff and a few Lapwing didn’t stay around for long with the steady turnover of people enjoying a walk around the marsh today. Unfortunately whenever the Lapwing flock resettled they were flushed again by the next group of people passing by.

17.07.16.Little Grebes (juvenile), No.6 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (7)Out on No.6 tank the ducks present very much reflected the same species as yesterday along with a juvenile Great Crested Grebe was a healthy supply of parent and juvenile Dabchick.

17.07.16. Reed Bunting (male), No.5 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (18)

The begging calls of juvenile Common Buzzard chasing their parents high in the sky filled the air and one particular bird was attracting the unwelcomed attention of a Kestrel.

17.07.16. Sign on Moorditch Lane, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (2)

A day of little activity from the birds and their “managed habitat” on No.3 tank and of course we birders.

Cuckoo video: https://vimeo.com/175145279 

Observers: Tony Broome, Paul Ralston, WSM (video and images).

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