The Views of and from Frodsham Marsh

The Views of and from Frodsham Marsh

07.03.15. CEGB area, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (12)

Frodsham Hill (Overton Hill) stands above Frodsham and marks the begining or end of the Sandstone trail that runs like a crookered backbone through the Cheshire Plain and shuddered to a halt at Whitchurch on the Cheshire/Staffs border. Thirty four miles of some of the finest Cheshire scenery.

07.03.15. CEGB area, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (7)

The main railway line from Manchester to Chester runs through Frodsham and the bridge made of sandstone and its arches cross the River Weaver on the outskirts of the marsh.

07.03.15. CEGB area, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (4)

Sadly all that remains of this once magnificent church isthe imposing and splendid spire of Trinity Church, which was saved from demolition by public donations from the people of Frodsham. In the distance the Indian head dress profile of Helsby Hill rock face dominates the backdrop.

07.03.15. Liverpool skyline from Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (3)

The impressive skyline of Liverpool across the River Mersey from Frodsham Marsh highlights the old Cathedral and the new Hilton Hotel on the waterfront there.

07.03.15. Lenticular clouds over No.6 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (5)

Big cloudy skies from above the marsh.

07.03.15.  Lenticular clouds over No.6 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (2)

Cloud stacks known as lenticular clouds were a feature in the sky today and were noticed from far and wide.

07.03.15.  Lenticular clouds over No.6 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (8)

A view of the cloud formations from the ramp on Moorditch Lane.

07.03.15. Grubbing out hedgerow on No.5 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (8)

It was a bit of a shock today to see this tractor with a long arm hedge cutter working along the track on No.5 tank and above No.6 tank. It was engaged in clearing out the treeline in preparation of the ‘Wind Turbines’ expected this year. It had to happen sometime but all this habitat loss brought the same reaction when they started construction of No.6 tank all those years ago, and you are never really prepared yourself when work eventually starts.

07.03.15. Grubbing out hedgerow on No.5 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (13)

Steel yourself for your next visit here.

17.06.13 . Spindle Ermine Moth caterpillars, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton..

The Spindle bushes above the north side of No.6 tank used to attract millions of Ermine moth caterpillars…no more!

07.03.15. Grubbing out hedgerow on No.5 tank, Frodsham Marsh

What is left of the Spindle bushes.

07.03.15. Grubbing out hedgerow on No.5 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (6)

The bend in the track at the junction of No’s 6, 5 and 3 tanks.

07.03.15. Grubbing out hedgerow on No.5 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton (2)

Some aggressive pruning!

07.03.15. No.3 tank, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton

The mitigation area on No.3 tank looking west from No.5 tank.

Above images by WSM.

07.03.15. Paul Ralston (8)

A view of Stanlow by Paul Ralston.

07.03.15. Birdlog

07.03.15. Birdlog

07.03.15. Yellowhammer, Frodsham Marsh.Paul Ralston

I started off along New Pale Road this morning at the water work treatment plant which has been a regular place for Yellowhammer over the years. There were four birds there this morning which is always good to see. Next stop was at the Weaver Bend where the water birds included: Goldeneye, Pochard, Common Shelduck, Common Teal, Mallard and Great Crested Grebe were on the river.

07.03.15. Stonechat, Weaver Bend, Frodsham Marsh. Paul Ralston

A party of 6 Stonechat were on the path by the Bailey bridge with Long-tailed Tit, Redwing and Song Thrush in the hawthorn bushes.

On to No.6 tank where I joined forces with Arthur H and we both saw the Marsh Harrier over the reed bed as were several Common Buzzard and a Peregrine which drifted high up and out towards the salt marsh. The mitigation pool held Common Teal, Redshank and a dozen Common Snipe which dropped into the ditch alongside.

Leaving the marsh along Lordship Lane by the model flying club field another 4 Stonechat were sat out on the fence line.

07.03.15. Long-tailed Tit Frodsham Marsh. Paul Ralston

Observer: Paul Ralston (images 1-3).

07.03.15. Cetti's Warbler, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton

A chance sighting of a very vocal and animated Cetti’s Warbler was rewarded with some fine views (note leg ring). Additional birds close by included a Nuthatch, a Treecreeper, Coal Tit, 5 Bullfinch, several Jay and a sub-singing Chiffchaff – a rewarding morning considering the rarity value of most of these birds here on the marsh.

Observers: Frank Duff, WSM (images 4-5).

07.03.15. Cetti's Warbler, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton

High tide on the river forced a few waders onto No.6 tank with 240 Dunlin, 60 Golden Plover, 343 Lapwing, 2 Black-tailed Godwit and 5 Redshank. Gulls were few in number but included 45 Common Gull, 67 Black-headed, 4 Lesser Black-backed and 3 Herring Gull. 4 Mute Swan, 14 Shoveler, 3 Common Pochard, 12 Tufted Duck, 68 Mallard and 147 Common Teal made up the waterfowl contingent.

Observer: WSM.

A watch from the northern banks of No.4 tank was rewarded with a Marsh Harrier, 5 Pink-footed Goose and a solitary Bar-tailed Godwit.

Observer: Tony Broome.

Also noted on this warm Spring day was a Stoat, a Buff-tailed Bumblebee and 2 Small Tortoiseshell Butterfly.