Where’s What on Frodsham Marsh?

Where’s What on Frodsham Marsh?

Frodsham Marsh map. Updated Feb'15

Updated February 2015 Frodsham Marsh Map

31.12.14. Views of Frodsham Marsh from Frodsham Hill. Bill Morton

With the start of a new year it would be a good time to renew and refresh some of Frodsham Marshes most popular birding spots. Attached is an updated map and with the aid of these photographs we hope it helps to put a bit of meat on the bones of that map.

The photograph above shows the main birding spots to the central-eastern part of the marsh.

31.12.14. Views of Frodsham Marsh from Froda ave. Bill Morton (30)

The decommissioned power station blue-topped chimney at the former I.C.I works (now Ineos Chlor). The chimney is a favourite resting spot for one or two Peregrines. Beyond the Weaver Sluice gates that now regulate and hold back the flow of the River Weaver is the River Mersey and estuary. The Weaver Estuary is an ideal area for wintering ducks and grebes. The raised bank of the Weaver Causeway provides access to the Weaver Bend.

31.12.14. Views of Frodsham Marsh from Frodsham Hill. Bill Morton

Further along the Weaver Causeway lays the Shooters’ Pools and was very productive for birds during its first Spring and Summer. The Weaver Bend is much neglected by birders these days but is always worth a look. The Lum is a reed bed which always look likely to hold something special. The I.C.I tank was once a sludge tank but is now covered in rough grass and scattered willow/alder trees.

31.12.14. Views of Frodsham Marsh from Frodsham Hill. Bill Morton

Four of the five pools making up the Shooters’ Pools. Weston Marsh was once managed by the Merseyside Naturalist Association (MNA). Not sure what happened to that situation but it is no longer accessible to the public.

31.12.14. Views of Frodsham Marsh from Frodsham Hill. Bill Morton

The impressive works of the Growhow factory provides a good focal point for many sunset photographs from No.6 tank. The M56 cuts through Helsby Marshes and further out lay Ince Marsh and No.4 tank.

31.12.14. Views of Frodsham Marsh from Frodsham Hill. Bill Morton

The Liverpool skyline dominates the backdrop from the banks of Frodsham Score with Hale Head and the lighthouse being ideal for visual migration (vismig).

31.12.14. Views of Frodsham Marsh from Frodsham Hill. Bill Morton.

The central part of the marsh with No.6 tank being the most productive area and behind it lays the newly developed No.3 mitigation area. No.2 and No.5 tanks are grazing farmland whereas Frodsham Score is an isolated salt marsh separated from the marsh by the Manchester Ship Canal.

31.12.14. Views of Frodsham Marsh from Frodsham Hill. Bill Morton

The open flooded No.6 tank (eastern section) is ideal for ducks with the western area good for harriers. No.3 tank is already attracting big numbers of Lapwing and Golden Plover (1,000 birds recently).

18.01.15. No.4 tank et al, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton

No.4 tank showing the meandering Holpool Gutter mostly hidden left and below No.4 tank. The white specks on Frodsham Score are Whooper and Bewick’s (honest) Swans.

18.01.15. No.4 tank et al, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton

The M56 bottom of photograph gives you some idea how close you drive through the marsh and how close you really are to the River Mersey.

18.01.15. No.4 tank et al, Frodsham Marsh. Bill Morton

Frodsham Marsh aerial view from aeroplane approaching Liverpool airport, Sept'03 copyAnother view  showing the sites from the east.

31.12.14. Views of Frodsham Marsh from Froda Ave, Churchfieldsl. Bill Morton (29)

A view of Frodsham Marsh from my old home at Froda Avenue, Frodsham.

I hope these images come in useful for when you next visit the marsh. Good Birding.

All images by WSM.